The Latest

Sep 30, 2014 / 101,252 notes
Sep 30, 2014 / 1,156,014 notes

ekarusryndren:

anotherfirebender:

m1ssred:

chemical reaction

*how to spawn demons: a beginner’s guide to chemistry

image

(via pomme--de-terre)

Sep 30, 2014 / 469 notes
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(via fake-mermaid)

Sep 30, 2014 / 27,995 notes

toopunktofuck:

one of new jersey’s most famous confections, saltwater taffy, was invented because some asshole’s candy shop flooded and ruined all his taffy and he sold it to a child anyway and i think that pretty much says a lot about the overall cultural climate of new jersey

(via afternoonsnoozebutton)

beckdamisendgame:

theyahooanswers:

Am I gay?

HOW DOES THAT EVEN HAPPEN
Sep 30, 2014 / 353,474 notes

beckdamisendgame:

theyahooanswers:

Am I gay?

HOW DOES THAT EVEN HAPPEN

(via xxxbrittanikieanaxxx)

There are a few things in life so beautiful they hurt: swimming in the ocean while it rains, reading alone in empty libraries, the sea of stars that appear when you’re miles away from the neon lights of the city, bars after 2am, walking in the wilderness, all the phases of the moon, the things we do not know about the universe, and you.
Sep 30, 2014 / 46,379 notes
timothykelleherseyebrows:

#fitness #motivation
Sep 30, 2014 / 31,171 notes

timothykelleherseyebrows:

#fitness #motivation

(via hkirkh)

Sep 30, 2014 / 3,819 notes

genderqueerbarnes:

asexualupin:

genderqueerbarnes:

upallnightogetloki:

wordsofdiana:

theimancameron:

universitybookstore:

This year’s Banned Books Week is officially September 21-27, but we Seattle-ites have been celebrating banned and challenged books all month long. Some of our favorite books happen to be frequently challenged titles (funny how that happens, isn’t it?), and we love a good opportunity to celebrate both freedom of speech and a great story. See below for some of the banned/challenged books we’re sharing in our Children’s Book department as well as the reasons they were banned. (Also check out the American Library Association website for more frequently banned titles by decade.)

- And Tango Makes Three by Peter Parnell and Justin Richardson. Reasons: Homosexuality, unsuited for age group.

- In the Night Kitchen by Maurice Sendak. Reasons: nudity, offensive language, sexually explicit.

- Captain Underpants (series) by Dav Pilkey. Reasons: Offensive language, anti-family content, violence, unsuited for age group.

- Bone (series) by Jeff Smith. Reasons: Political viewpoint, racism, violence.

- Julie of the Wolves by Jean Craighead George. Reasons: unsuited to age group, violence.

- The Golden Compass (His Dark Materials trilogy) by Philip Pullman. Reasons: political viewpoint, religious viewpoint, and violence.

- ttyl by Lauren Myracle. Reasons: offensive language; religious viewpoint; sexually explicit; unsuited to age group.

- Athletic Shorts by Chris Crutcher. Reasons: homosexuality and offensive language.

- The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian by Sherman Alexie. Reasons: Drugs/alcohol/smoking, offensive language, racism, sexually explicit, unsuited to age group.

Judging by this, I think I may have accidentally read more banned books than unbanned books in my childhood.

How the fuck did ‘The Hungry Caterpillar’ end up a banned book?

Literally what i was about to ask.

It was banned because it “supports overeating” or something I don’t remember exactly. One of my old librarians explained it, but that was awhile go.

…it is literally about a caterpillar, tho.

Then again, it’s the banned book list, where books about rape are on it for “promoting sexual deviancy” or whatever. I guess the list doesn’t really have to make sense.

(via lydiras)

Sep 30, 2014 / 1,712 notes

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snazziest:

I’m reading your palm and it says it belongs on my butt

(via dontlistentobitches)

Sep 30, 2014 / 7,032 notes